Kennedy Center President Inspires

Earlier this month, Deborah Rutter spoke to the weekly luncheon of the National Press Club (NPC) in Washington, D.C. Thanks to the transcript posted on NPC’s website, we almost feel like we were in the audience [applause] – except we’re still hungry! [laughter] Rutter took on the prominent role of Kennedy Center president in September, and is the first woman to hold that position. While her remarks received some national media attention, here are a few interesting highlights we took away: Art Tells Stories. In the manner of all good …

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USITT Working to Define Essential Skills

J.R. Clancy Rigging

Let’s say you’re a technical director at a regional theatre. You’re looking to fill an entry-level electrician position on your staff, and you receive two resumes from recent college graduates. Each of these resumes shows that the applicant has a theatre degree, and they’ve each had some hands-on experience as electricians for campus productions. Does that give you enough information to select one over the other? It’s not nearly enough, notes David Grindle, executive director of the United States Institute for Theatre Technology (USITT), and it’s time to do something …

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Q&A Spotlight: Rejuvenate Your Festival

Mentor Ohio Beach Aerialist

Interview with Jill Korsok, Recreation Program Manager, City of Mentor, Ohio. Korsok is a presenter at this week’s National Recreation and Park Association (NRPA) Congress; her session is titled: Rejuvenate Your Festival: How to Avoid McFestivalization. YPP: Why is “McFestivalization” a bad thing? Korsok: Any recurring event – large or small – can become boring if the elements never change. In the fast food industry, standardization is great because people expect to be able to order the same exact thing at each location, but that’s not the case in the …

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Forget the Alamo: Tobin Center Grabs Spotlight

The biggest splash in the U.S. performing arts scene is the new $203 million Tobin Center for the Performing Arts, which opened last month in San Antonio. We’ll highlight this beautiful facility more in the future, but today we’ll showcase excerpts from news coverage: Sir Paul Approves. Exactly 45 years to the day after the Beatles’ “Abbey Road” album was released, Paul McCartney performed a fundraiser concert Oct. 1 to benefit the Tobin Center, with ticket prices ranged from $250 to $3,500. After just two songs, he told the crowd …

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Controversy-Free Met Opera News

Maybe it’s the art form of opera that attracts controversy? The Metropolitan Opera grabbed the media spotlight in recent months, first with rancorous labor-management negotiations and recently with uproar about upcoming performances of “The Death of Klinghoffer” – decried by some Jewish groups for endorsing terrorism. We’re glad the union agreements were reached, so opera lovers in New York City – and around the world via the Met’s “Live in HD” outreach – can enjoy the shows. This week we’ll explore several interesting, controversy-free Met stories: What’s a Field Worth? …

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Two Rigging Standards Available for Public Review

Are you familiar with the current standards for the installation and safe operation of fire safety curtains? For that matter, are you aware that there are documented standards for fire curtains—and for many other kinds of stage equipment? PLASA, the international trade association for entertainment technology professionals, brings together the top minds in the industry to develop standards for theatre equipment and procedures. Its Technical Standards Program—accredited by the American National Standards Institute (ANSI)—promotes safe working conditions at every level of production. You can find standards here for the use …

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Q&A Spotlight: “Big Data” Helping the Arts

Kushner-Guitar

Interview with Roland J. Kushner, Ph.D., Economist, Arts Researcher and Musician YPP: Why was the Local Arts Index developed? Kushner: Americans for the Arts had vast experience with overall measurements in creating our National Arts Index: we’ve tracked more than 80 national-level indicators going back to 1998. The Local Index maps data onto specific communities as much as possible, down to the county level. Americans for the Arts Vice President Randy Cohen and I developed this along with Martin Cohen from the Cultural Planning Group. YPP: Where does local data …

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Audience Etiquette: Leavers & Latecomers

theater etiquette

Controversial aspects of audience behavior – expressing dissatisfaction by walking out early and disrupting performances by arriving late – were recently highlighted in two lengthy articles in The New York Times. Voting with Feet. “Walk-outs” vote with their feet and skip the rest of the movie, concert, ballet, etc., for a variety of reasons. A question about their motivation posted on the paper’s Facebook page received nearly 500 responses, evoking common themes. For movies, excessive violence was a frequent complaint. For live performances, the quality of the presentation factored heavily. …

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Pay Comparisons: Music Careers & Pro Athletes

The topic of “pay transparency” is making business headlines recently, with more companies deciding to openly share what each employee is paid rather than banning such discussions. Our bare-and-share-it-all social media culture is credited with encouraging openness, facilitated by wage-comparison websites like Payscale.com and Glassdoor.com. The income of star athletes is already publicized and ranked, along with their performance statistics compiled for fantasy leagues. But what about careers in the performing arts? This Labor Day week we’ll riff on salary comparisons between a variety of sports figures and a few …

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Rigging Problems, Part II: How to tell there’s a problem

Equipment wears down with regular use. Do you know how to tell if there’s a problem with your rigging? Sudden increase in difficulty moving a set. Consistency is a hallmark of quality. Any equipment that is inconsistent has something wrong with it. Noise while moving a set. Scraping, squeaking, squealing, or a prolonged squawk are all signs of trouble. There should be no noise in the system other than the occasional, slight sound of an arbor’s guide on the guide system. Vibrations or change in the feel of the set. …

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